Tag Archives: community

Extra Credits parts company with The Escapist.

Breaking news is happening more and more often on socail media as people, groups and collectives choose to speak first to the people who are their fans and have connected with them. This is what happened this evening as the ExtraCreditTeam used Facebook and Twitter to announce they have parted company with The Escapist.

Statement taken from the Facebook status page:

http://www.facebook.com/ExtraCredits?sk=wall&filter=2

Hi Guys
I’m sorry about a lot of things over the last month. I’m sorry that I’ve been incommunicative. I’m sorry that I’ve been snappish. I’m sorry that I haven’t talked to you about what’s been going on. It’s been a rough few weeks, but I can finally talk about it, so here’s what’s been happening with us…
(this may take a bit, I’m sorry for spamming you too…)
When Allison hurt her arm all I wanted was to help her. I believe that a person has a responsibility to those near them and you should feel shame when you can’t live up to that responsibility…but I couldn’t. I was near destitute. I had spent all my money on the show.
Dan and I work on it for free and I pay Allison’s salary out of pocket each month, then, in turn, The Escapist was supposed to pay us for our work – not much, but enough to cover Allison’s wages – unfortunately they were never able to.
When Allison hurt her arm, The Escapist had only paid us for four episodes over the course of a year. That meant I was down $20,000. That was the $20,000 I could have put in to help Allison. That was the $20,000 I would have used to get her surgery while figuring out how I could earn more money. It hurt that I couldn’t tell you that then but I was asked not to.
I felt so bad asking without being able to do more than sell a computer and call in old debts…but you taught me a lesson in humanity and the goodness of people. I had never lost my faith in mankind, but that first Rockethub week you redoubled it.

And that was truly one of the greatest weeks of my life. Better than releasing games, better than lecturing in the halls of GDC. I really can never say thank you enough.
But since then things have not gone so well. We joined The Escapist because we believed in what was going on there. We believed in the idea of examining games more thoroughly, whether it was Yahtzee’s blunt honesty or ENN delivering game news, we liked the idea that it was a place where consumers and developers could have a real conversation about games. We believed we were all in this together, fighting for the same ideals and goals.
We asked the guys at The Escapist if we could trade some of the debt they owed us for the rights to our intellectual property back if they weren’t going to be able to pay us so we could do things like sell t-shirts or write a book. We thought this was going to be an easy discussion. Instead they responded by telling us that they felt that they were entitled to 75% of the Rockethub money, thus their debt was covered and, despite not paying us for nearly a year, we owed them $9500 dollars
What followed was weeks of legal wrangling, lies and muck. Unless you guys really care about the details I won’t go over them here. I do think The Escapist does some good, and I wouldn’t want to destroy what good it does with how they operate their business. I’m going to work under the idea that our situation was unique and that their other content creators are paid regularly and don’t have a contract that was as onerous as ours.
Again: we don’t want to add to the damage done. I’m already kind of heartbroken that things turned out this way. I had faith in what The Escapist stood for. That faith is in tatters, but it doesn’t mean that there aren’t good people doing good things for The Escapist.
What matters is that the show won’t stop. We’ll be releasing it on YouTube every Thursday until we find another site to pick it up. We’ll be posting links to here and on our twitter feed whenever a new episode goes up…but we’ll be counting on you guys to help let people know.

More of the issue esp around money outstanding and the nature of the contracts signed was posted about on twitter. That The Escapist held the rights to all the Intellectual Property rights associated with the Extra Credits show.

http://twitter.com/#!/ExtraCreditz

@ExtraCreditz ExtraCreditTeam
(I’ve now spent more on lawyers than we were ever paid for the show…this isn’t what I wanted at all)

@ExtraCreditz ExtraCreditTeam
The Escapist is still claiming our IP and our back catalog of episodes as “work for hire” though we weren’t paid ;_(

Extra Credits is a show which I have always watched, the content being some of the best which I have see discussing female gamers, gender in games, how achievements play a part in the gaming experience, the socail impacts of games as we learn about the psychology of gaming and how it can be used in other areas of life.

When 1 part of that team needed surgery the many fans of the show who want to see the show go one, chipped in to make it happen and frankly it is galling to read that the powers at be at The escapist tried to say they had a right to that money, esp when they had not been for filling their end of the contract which was in place.

I wish the Extra Credits Team the very best and hope that they will continue their good work else were.

GothDay Events 2011

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Dominion is lending support for GothDay Events

First 3pm, one of our own DJs The Siren aka Sinead writes

‘Celebrate World Goth Day in style with a gothic picnic. We’ll be meeting at 3pm in the Iveagh Gardens, Dublin 2, for an afternoon of tea and cakes (or whatever takes your fancy), bring snacks sandwiches whatever you wish, and music will be provided, gothic attire encouraged, All welcome!’

Then later 8pm (ish) one of our regulars Luana writes

‘In order to celebrate our Awesomeness during the World Goth Day…. I declare that the best way we can all celebrate it here in Dublin is to have a *drum roll please* a Pub-Crawl!!!
http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=208584772508830 for the facebook users

All Goths and Goth Friendly People are invited.

MEETING POINT:
O’Reilly’s – Sublounge, underneath Tara Station, 8pm ish
http://oreillys.ie/
All pints €3.20

2ND PUB:
The Longstone, 10 Townsend Street (2mins away)
i hope to mo move all people to the second pub around 9.30-10ish
currently contracting in getting some sort of Discounts or free stuffs if we are plenty :))))

3RD PUB:
Gypsy Rose, Aston Quay
nice atmosphere, pehraps some bands on, good vibe
http://www.yelp.ie/biz/the-gypsy-rose-dublin

4TH PUB:
The Mezz
http://mezzbar.weebly.com/

End of the night if you are still standing or crawling let’s all finish in the Mezz just because

I know that you are all hard to please, so if anybody wants to come up with some suggestions for the night feel free to drop a text, I am open for suggestions!

Please spread the word among all those goths hiding away in their coffins and to their ‘goth freindly’ friends

Gaming with your daughter is good for her

http://ingame.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2011/02/01/5962255-gaming-with-your-daughter-is-good-for-her

By Winda Benedetti

Listen up parents: If you’re not a video game player and your child is, now might be a good time to pick up a game controller and pick up a new pastime.

While many parents worry that letting their children play video games will have a negative impact on them, a new study from Brigham Young University has found that when parents play games with their children — specifically their daughters — it can actually be good for them.

Researchers from BYU’s School of Family Life in Provo, Utah, found that girls who played age-appropriate video games with a parent felt more connected to their families, had fewer mental health issues and fewer problems with aggressive behavior.

And the researchers say this is the first study to show that gaming with an adult can be good for a girl.

For the study, published in Tuesday’s issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health, researchers Sarah Coyne and Laura Padilla-Walker had 287 families with children between 11 and 16 years old complete video game-, behavioral-, and family-related questionnaires. They report:

We found an association between co-playing of video games and lowered internalizing (e.g., depression/anxiety) and aggressive behavior. Furthermore, girls who co-played with their parents reported more prosocial behavior toward family members, which may be a function of higher relationship quality between daughters and parents who co-play. These findings certainly confirm parents’ own views of co-playing, who believe that co-playing would result in positive social and emotional outcomes. Furthermore, they allay fears that co-playing video games results in negative outcomes, at least for girls.

So why the positive impact? According to the article published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, the researchers surmise:

[I]When parents play video games with their daughters, they may be sending a myriad of messages. First, parents may show that they are willing to engage in an activity that is important to daughters. Second, playing video games can represent quality time between a daughter and a parent, especially when such play involves conversation between parent–child.[/I]

As a gamer and parent myself, this all simply makes good sense to me. After all, parents and their children have been playing games together since the dawn of time. Just because a game now appears on a TV, via a sophisticated machine, doesn’t mean it has to be any less of a healthy, positive experience for a family.

But there are a couple of interesting twists in the study’s findings.

The researchers found that playing games with a parent did not have an impact on the behavior or family connection for boys. Compare that to girls, for whom playing with a parent accounted for as much as 20 percent of the variation on the measured outcomes.

The researchers said it’s possible that the time boys play with parents doesn’t stand out as much because they spend much more time playing with friends. The researchers said they plan to explore the reasons behind the gender differences as they continue working on the project.

Something else worth noting: The BYU researchers found that 31 percent of the children reported playing age-inappropriate games with their parents (42 percent of boys, 15 percent of girls) and they report that “heightened parent–child connection was not found for girls who played these age-inappropriate games with their parents.”
[I]
“It is possible that exposure to such inappropriate content may influence both parent and daughter mood and ability to respond to each other,” the researchers write. “Additionally, such games are often very intense and may interfere with conversation or interaction that may lead to heightened levels of connection.”[/I]

And finally, the researchers point out that few of the mothers surveyed played games. So it was really the father/daughter time that was having an impact on the girls.

To that I say: Kudos to dads who play games with their daughters. And to the moms who don’t: Give it a try. It’s a lot of fun and your daughters and sons will love you for caring enough to give gaming a go.

In case you’re wondering, “Mario Kart,” “Super Mario Brothers,” “Wii Sports,” “Rock Band” and “Guitar Hero” were the games played most often by the girls in the study. Meanwhile, boys reported “Call of Duty,” “Wii Sports” and “Halo” as their most-played games.

All of which makes me wonder … parents, which games do you like to play with your sons and daughters? And which games do you think do the best job helping you connect with your kids?

Being a gamer myself I may be sligthly biased but I do think playing with your kids is awesome, for me and mind it’s co op games on the xbox like castlecrashers or being each other’s henchmen in Fable or cardgames like Munchkin or boardgames.

My parents played with us when I was growing up from the atari system to boggle, scrabble, card games endless games of ludo and chess. Some of my best memories are of time spent sitting about playing games and I try to make that happen for my two.

First Irish Fetish Flea Market.

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Time: 29 January · 14:00 – 18:00
Location: Outhouse, 105 Capel St, Dublin 1.

Welcome to the First Irish Fetish Flea Market.
A Place to sell leather, rubber, uniforms, boots, toys (except dildos, or the like, for health reasons… even if they are new and still in original wrappers), books, DVDs, bondage gear… etc.

There are two aspects to the Flea Market. The first if it gives anyone with old, unused or unwanted fetish gear an opportunity to sell it for a bit of cash. Second, it gives people a chance to …buy gear, especially anyone new to the Fetish scene wanting to start their collection.

We will take anything related to fetish… leather, rubber, uniforms, boots, toys (except dildos, or the like, for health reasons… even if they are new and still in original wrappers), books, DVDs, bondage gear… etc.

Sellers have two options. If they have a lot to sell they can take a table at €10 (to cover cost of hiring the venue). Sellers wishing to take a table should register before the day of the Flea Market (khayden@iol.ie). Or if they only have a small number of items to sell they can leave them with us to sell on their behalf. The fee is €2 per item and they can bring them along on the day, preferably before the Flea Market starts at 2pm.

Many people order things of the internet and when it arrives find it’s not really what they wanted or that they never get around to using it or find that it’s not really what they are into after all. So this is a change to have a bring and buy sale and is also a way to support Outhouse.

The Gideon international, thier books and schools.

We all know that the Gideon are a group who put bibles in every place they can squeeze one in. apprently they have managed 1.5 billion in hotels, hospitals prisons army and now schools here in Ireland.

The young lad who is in 1st year came home with a pocket edition of the new testament and proverbs and psalms, they came into the community school gave them out and he was instructed by the teacher to take one and to put his name on it and to keep it in his bag and the class was told to read a bit from it every day.

This book is not on the book list it is not part of the curriculum, but this evangelical organisation was allowed in the school and it’s literature was pressed on every child. The book has a special index in the front which points to passages to help with life’s problems, christian virtue and character.

I am staggered they were allowed in the school and it was given out and that my son who is not christian (and the teachers are aware of that) was instructed to take one and put his name on it.

Am I the only one who thinks this is well out of order?

Today is Bisexual Visibility Day.

What is Bisexual visibility day?
Well it’s a day to talk about and celebrate being Bisexual.

Bisexual erasure is something which happens a fair bit, it is the presumption that if a person who is Bi is in a relationship with someone of the same gender that they are now gay or if they are in a relationship with someone of the opposite gender that they are now straight.

The gender of the other person doesn’t change their sexuality they are still bisexual. They are still the person they were before.

There are a lot of negative assumptions about people who are bisexual and there is a lot of biphobia in society in both the ‘gay’ and ‘straight’ communities. The only way to try and reduce this is to talk about it and that won’t happen unless people are visible.

Celebrate Bisexuality day or Bisexual Visibility Day has been running for the last 11 years and has been spreading steadily.

There are groups and supports for those who are coming out as bi or who just want some support from others who understand.

Outhouse hosts a belong to group for teens to young adults and the Bi Irish group.

While a lot of people understand and accept people who are gay there are those who still don’t accept or understand that someone can be bisexual and that they are not greedy, or confused or afraid to come all the way out, or that they can not be in a monogamous relationship or that bisexuals are not likely to cheat more then anyone else.

Sexuality is not a binary, it’s not just homosexual or heterosexual there is a space in between, not everyone is one or the other some of us are attracted to people of either gender rather then just one.

New school, new term, new learning curve.

Spent the morning in meeting in the school, Secured permission for my eldest to read “novels” at the back of religion class must get Ghandi Rand Vedic texts prose Edda for him 😀

Had a bit of a show down with the Vice head who is in her sixties when I asked for my name to noted on the contact file as I was getting phone calls asking for Mrs X and letters addressed as Mr & Mrs X. “Oh we just assume that as his name is X that…” I pointed out how wrong the assumption was and that the majority of children born the last 10 years are to parents who are not married and she then said but it’s just easier, so I pointed out that even the primary school uses “parents/guardians of X” on all the letters and she was confused as to why and I pointed out that one of the new intake who was in my son’s class in primary had his mother die in the last 6 months and another girl is an orphan being raised by her grandparents.

Why a decade into the 21st Century am I having to point these thing out ?

“Pride” and famlies and teachers.

This week is Pride week in Dublin as well as many places around the Globe.
It has been great to see it become a full week with many events on which show a lot more
of the diversity of the LGBTQ community.

The listing of the events can be found here: http://www.dublinpride.ie/

Two which caught my eye is the week long showing of The Wizard of Oz in the Screen Cinema.
Who wouldn’t want a chance to see this on the large screen also it is something I can bring my brats to.

Usually Pride and kids would be something which most people would not think would or should mix,
I have had encounters which were less then friendly when I have been in town with them and brought them to have a look at the parade in previous years. Indeed most people seem to think ‘gay’ people don’t have kids or don’t have contact with kids or should not have contact with kids both those in the ‘straight’ and ‘gay’ communities but that has got to change.

This year Outhouse is having a family fun house event.

Come to the Family Fun House afternoon where there will be clowns, face painters, a bouncing castle, a games console on the big screen and make-and-eat chocolate treats. This is a day for parents to unwind and let the kids have fun, so bring your sons, daughters, nieces, nephews, cousin’s and younger siblings along for some great fun and bring out the kid in you too. (All Children must be accompanied by an adult)

For further information please contact Fiona on (01) 873-4999.

Admission: Free
No tickets required.

I am really glad to see this, people who are lgbt are also parents, aunt, uncles ect and children should in my opinion aware that there are lgbt family members. My own two know that some people like men, and some people like women and some people like both it’s not weird it’s just how people are. This way children grow up with positive messages about
being lgbt and if they are when they grow up they don’t feel so isolated and have no one to relate to which can cause a lot of issues.

This year also in the Pride Parade all the primary and second-level teaching unions (INTO, TUI, ASTI) will have an official presence. This is a huge step forward.

Currently under Section 37 of the Employment Equality Act, schools can fire teachers who are LGBT as it is said to conflict with the ethos of the school, which means as 92% of all primary schools have a catholic ethos, all of those schools can fire a teacher if they are outed. Hopefully this will change there have been calls to have it abolished.

I think all of this is a massive step forward towards shifting away from the idea that ‘Gays’ don’t have families we are after all, someone’s sons and daughters, brother, sister and being lgbt does not make a person anti family, or that they don’t have pride in their family.

“Ten things an Irish woman could not do in 1970”

Yesterday there was a booklet in the times about Irish women and how times and things have changed. As the saying goes eaten bread is soon forgotten and we have a generation of Irish women who have grown up benefiting from the hard work put in to make socail change and not knowing how things were before and all to happy to distance themselves from being considered a Feminist or Womens’ Libber (hell some of them wouldn’t know the term Womens’ Libber) and don’t think that socail change is possible or that they can effect it.

Yes men played a part in this too, supporting the changes and making them happen,
there are male feminists out there, and more feminists of both genders then most people in Ireland would suspect.

http://www.irishtimes.com/indepth/sisters/changes-from-1970s.html

1 Keep her job in the public service or a bank when she got married

Female civil servants and other public servants (primary teachers, from 1958, were excluded from the so-called “marriage bar”) had to resign from their jobs when they got married, on the grounds that they were occupying a job that should go to a man. Banks operated a similar policy.

How it changed

The marriage bar in the public service was removed in July 1973, on foot of the report of the first Commission on the Status of Women. In 1977, the Employment Equality Act prohibited discrimination on the grounds of gender or marital status in almost all areas of employment.

2 Sit on a jury

Under the 1927 Juries Act, members of juries had to be property owners and, in effect, male.

How it changed

Mairín de Burca and Mary Anderson challenged the Act and won their case in the Supreme Court in 1976. The old Act was repealed and citizens over 18 who are on the electoral register are eligible for juries.

3 Buy contraceptives

The 1935 Criminal Law Amendment Act banned the import, sale and distribution of contraceptives. Some women were able to get doctors to prescribe the Pill as a “cycle regulator” or to fit devices such as the cap. In 1969, the Fertility Guidance Clinic was established in Dublin and used a loophole in the law to give away the Pill for free. (It was thus not being sold.) Most rural and working class women had no access to contraceptives.

How it changed

The Commission on the Status of Women in 1972 delicately suggested that “parents have the right to regulate the number and spacing of their family” but stopped short of an open demand for contraception. The Rotunda hospital, the Irish Family Planning Association and student unions began to distribute contraceptives. The law, however, changed very slowly. The McGee case of 1973 established a right to import contraceptives for personal use, but did not allow them to be sold. A Bill to allow for controlled access was defeated in 1974. In 1979, in an infamous “Irish solution to an Irish problem”, an Act was passed to allow doctors to prescribe contraceptives to married couples only. A 1985 Act allowed contraceptives to be sold to anyone over 18 but only in chemists. The IFPA and Virgin Megastore were prosecuted for selling condoms in 1991. Later that year, the sale of contraceptives was liberalised.

4 Drink a pint in a pub

In 1970, some pubs refused to allow women to enter at all, some allowed women only if accompanied by a man and very many refused to serve women pints of beer. Women who were accidentally served a pint would be instructed to pour it into two half-pint glasses.

How it changed

Women’s groups staged protests in the early 1970s. In one instance, Nell McCafferty led a group of 30 women who ordered, and were served, 30 brandies.They then ordered one pint of Guinness. When the pint was refused, they drank the brandies and refused to pay as their order was not served. In 2002, the Equal Status Act banned gender discrimination in the provision of goods and services. It defined discrimination as “less favourable treatment”. Service can be refused only if there is a reasonable risk of disorderly or criminal conduct.

5 Collect her children’s allowance

The 1944 legislation that introduced the payment of children’s allowances (now called child benefit) specified that they be paid to the father. The father could, if he chose, mandate his wife to collect the money, but she had no right to it.

How it changed

Responding to the report of the Commission on the Status of Women, the 1974 Social Welfare Act entitled mothers to collect the allowance.

6 Get a barring order against a violent partner

In 1970, a women who was hospitalised after a beating by her husband faced a choice of either returning home to her abuser or becoming homeless. Abusive spouses could not be ordered to stay away from the family home, leaving many women little choice but to seek refuge elsewhere.

How it changed

Women’s Aid campaigned for changes in the law, and in 1976 the Family Law Act, Ireland’s first legislation on domestic violence, enabled one spouse to seek a barring order against the other where the welfare or safety of a spouse or children was at risk. The orders were for three months and were poorly implemented. In 1981, protection orders were introduced and barring orders were increased up to 12 months.

7 Live securely in her family home

Under Irish law, a married woman had no right to a share in her family home, even if she was the breadwinner. Her husband could sell the home without her consent.

How it changed

Under the Family Home Protection Act of 1976, neither spouse can sell the family home without the written consent of the other.

8 Refuse to have sex with her husband

In 1970 the phrase “marital rape” was a contradiction in terms. A husband was assumed to have the right to have sex with his wife and consent was not, in the eyes of the law, an issue.

Women’s adultery was also specifically penalised in the civil law, the notorious tort of “criminal conversation” or “CrimCon”: a husband could legally sue another man for compensation for sleeping with his wife.

How it changed

The Council for the Status of Women urged the creation of a crime of marital rape. In 1979 the Minister for Justice Gerard Collins declined to introduce legislation to this effect. Even when new legislation on rape was introduced in 1981, the situation did not change. It was not until 1990 that marital rape was defined as a crime. The first trial, in 1992, collapsed within minutes. The first successful prosecution for marital rape was in 2002.

Crim Con was abolished by the Family Law Act (1981). The Act also, as a dubious quid pro quo, abolished the right to sue for “breach of promise” of marriage – an ancient provision that was occasionally used by jilted women, although it was in theory also available to men.

9 Choose her official place of domicile

Under Irish law, a married woman was deemed to have the same “domicile” as her husband. This meant that if her husband left her and moved to Australia, her legal domicile was deemed to be Australia. Women, who could not get a divorce in Ireland, could find themselves divorced in countries where their husbands were domiciled.

How it changed

Acting on a report from the Law Reform Commission, the Fine Gael junior minister for women’s affairs Nuala Fennell drove forward the Domicile and Recognition of Foreign Divorces Bill in 1985. It granted married women the right to an independent domicile.

10 Get the same rate for a job as a man

In 1970, almost all women were paid less than male colleagues doing the same job. In March 1970, the average hourly pay for women was five shillings, while that for men was over nine. In areas covered by a statutory minimum wage, the female rate was two-thirds that of men.

How it changed

Legislation on equal pay was introduced in 1974 and employment equality legislation followed in 1977, both as a result of European directives.

Are We On Social Network xyz? – Dominion

What can happen when you don’t sign up on a socail networking site for your group/club/event.

Are We On Social Network xyz? – Dominion.

Are We On Social Network Du Jour

One question we are being increasingly asked by people is:
I sent you X amount of messages on FaceBook/MySpace/Bebo/Friendster etc. and you haven’t responded.
our reply of course is:
Dominion doesn’t have a FaceBook/MySpace/Bebo/Friendster, if you found one it isn’t us!

We are not into the idea of only members of a certain social networking site/service being able to contact us, or members of a particular service getting a different (either better or worse) service from us than non-members, (like for example only xxx service users seeing feedback posted to us on that service), we like equality (whether the information or service is good/bad is less important than open and available to everyone).

Fans/friends/well-wishers have mistakenly decided to set these up (Dominion Profiles/Groups/Networks) on our behalf, and usually eventually get bored stop maintaining or forget the password for them, and most importantly dont send us the messages, give us the accounts, or shut them down when we ask them to. Currently we know of several on each service, some very popular, and some with 0 friends, but we ask you to please de-friend (so as not to mis-lead others to them).

Feel free to politely ask them to close/delete whatever (they are probably un-maintained so there is little point), do not abuse/insult or negatively message the owners/operators, they probably thought any advertising is good but stale/misleading info is worse than none (as we have seen with our own recent outage).

For example, one particular site that seems to have gained a large following is the Facebook group Dominion Dublin – this is not, repeat NOT, run by us (the people who run the actual club), and indeed has very little to do with the club other than the name – please de-friend it, or at least don’t expect it to have any official information about the club… for example, some people might have missed it when we had DJ Jeyenne from XPQ-21 playing in Dominion a while back, as the Dominion Dublin Facebook site was actually advertising something completely different at the time. 0_o

This website is the only official source of information about forthcoming events, playlists, DJs etc – if this situation changes it will be announced here first.

Obviously, some of the people involved in the club also have their own personal Facebook/LiveJournal/MySpace etc pages – these are sometimes used to pass on information about upcoming events etc., and can be useful for those who forget/don’t have time to check this site regularly, but shouldn’t be taken as gospel – as always, check the information against this site if there’s any confusion or ambiguity.

At the same time we heartily encourage people to post links to our events and news on their own Facebook/LiveJournal/MySpace (we have even added buttons to make this easier to the site) as this way if/when the information changes the link published will continue to point at the correct information, as opposed to cutting/pasting the information from our page, and thus your readers not recieving updates.

Also, feel free to pass this page on to your friends also (using our handy new shiny social network buttons).

For those people who don’t have time to check the website itself every week, or forget to, or whatever, we also have a public RSS feed (provided by LiveJournal*) however it does allow feedbackcommenting by anyone, whether you have a LiveJournal account or not – please feel free to comment or ask questions there too, all feedback is appreciated.
Facebook users can as always “friend” the RSS via:
profile> settings> Imported Stories> Blog/Rss> add (enter dominion.gothic.ie into the field provided)

We are also now providing an announcement-only mailing-list for those not able to subscribe via RSS (experimentation still ongoing so expect some duplicates/).

Thanks to all the people, past, present and future, who support Dominion and help us remain Ireland’s longest-running weekly Goth/EBM/Industrial club – keep it up, and keep visiting http://dominion.gothic.ie/

Dominion is the only weekly nightclub in the whole island of Ireland devoted to gothic, industrial, EBM and associated alternative music. Launched in July 1999 and has kept going changing venues over the years,  it currently resides in The Cellar in Murrays Bar (formerly Frazers), 33-34 O’Connell Street, Dublin 1 , running on Saturdays from 9:30pm to 2:30am.