Tag Archives: health

Virgin selling condoms in Ireland.

http://www.virgin.com/richard-branson/blog/the-day-we-were-arrested-for-selling-condoms-in-dublin

The day we were arrested for selling condoms in Dublin

By Richard Branson –
Nov 19, 2012

When we were asked by the Irish Family Planning Association (IFPA) if we would let them sell condoms in our Dublin Virgin Megastore, we were happy to oblige. In May 1990 the IFPA were convicted for selling condoms in the Megastore and fined £400.

The IFPA appealed the conviction on Valentine’s Day 1991 and I testified on their behalf. On arriving late in Dublin, a policeman offered me an escort – and was shocked when I directed him straight to court! The judge increased the fine to £500 and warned future infringement could result in imprisonment. A certain rock band known as U2 stepped in to pay the fine.

It wasn’t until 1993 that laws restricting the sale of condoms in Ireland were overruled, while laws banning abortion are still in place. There are lots of groups, including the IFPA, still campaigning inside and outside of Ireland for sensible abortion laws.

I remember this, I also bought condoms in there, for myself and for friends. Chemists didn’t sell them unless you had a prescription from a dr. Condom vending machines were illegal, HIV/AIDS were a fact of life and still condoms were illegal here in except under very limited guidelines.

I remember when it became possible to by them and they had to sell them to anyone over the age of legal consent, but it was still a case of running the gauntlet and getting a very unwelcome reception in the chemist. Picking one in the city center or one which family and neighbors would not use and even then you could be left standing, for years condoms were strictly behind the counter and you had to ask for them.

And even then the assistant could say they had to check with the dispensing chemist I and certainly was a few times left standing, for anything from 20mins to a half hour, as it was clear they didn’t want to sell them to me and were hoping I would just leave.

Boots chemist changed that, condoms were on the floor of the shop, you could go and read the boxes and pick out what you wanted and mix them in with other purchases, for those reason alone they quickly became the place to go buy them where ever they opened up all over the country.

These days most pubs have condom machines in them, they are more available in a range of places all over the country. Attitudes have changed as well.
It’s seen a sensible to have them and not as immoral for women have have them.

These days I know I can go an buy a 2 for 3 offer on condoms and get 3 boxes of what I fancy with no one blinking an eye lid, compared to being treated like I had just asked for the head of the baby jesus and if I hung around long enough, I would eventually get them only when exiting the chemist to hear someone declare that I must be a Whore.

It was 19 years ago, in 1993 the laws changed, took longer for attitudes to change, but I am for ever thankful for the work the IFPA have done over the years and for people like Richard Branson and those who ran the stall in the Dublin Virgin Megastore for being so brave and bold.

Legislate for X reply from Joan Burton

Herself and no one from her offices responded to my initial email send on the 2nd of November, but responded to the one I send yesterday.

Fri, 16 Nov 2012 13:17:28

I wish to acknowledge and thank you for your recent email in relation to the tragic and dreadful story of Savita Halappanavar, the 31-year-old dentist who died from septicaemia in NUIG after being refused a termination when miscarrying.

First and foremost, this is a human tragedy, and all sympathies should be extended to her husband Praveen and her family who are now grieving.
Investigations are being carried out the by hospital’s risk review group and the HSE’s National Incident Management Team as well as by the coroner in Galway. In other words, we don’t know the full circumstances of the case, and we should resist the temptation to get drawn into coming to conclusions in absence of all the facts.

That does not mean that we can or should avoid considering this case in the context of the X Case and of the report of the Expert Group that was established by the Government.

This issue has been with us now for 20 years and this is the first Government that has decided that were are going to deal with it. We put place a process, an Expert Group chaired by Judge Ryan to address all of the issues, to make recommendations to us. That Expert Group looked for an extension on the period of time they needed to consider the issues. It is a complex and sensitive area. They have now completed their work, submitted their report to Minister for Health and will be presented to Cabinet once the Minister has considered its contents. Whether the Expert Group recommends legislation or regulation, we will not ignore it. Legal clarity is required on this issue.

The Programme for Government negotiated by both Labour and Fine Gael on forming government contains the following commitment:
“We acknowledge the recent ruling of the European Court of Human Rights subsequent to the established ruling of the Irish Supreme Court on the X-case. We will establish an expert group to address this issue, drawing on appropriate medical and legal expertise with a view to making recommendations to Government on how this matter should be properly addressed.”

Tackling the issues around the X Case is a complex matter and while Deputy Daly’s Private Members Bill was welcome in facilitating debate, it was not without flaws.
There were number of concerns around the detail and drafting of the Bill that lacked clarity and that could have caused confusion. The Bill was therefore not appropriate as a basis for addressing the many complexities in this area.

Yours Sincerely
Joan Burton TD
Minister for Social Protection
Constituency Office

Why “Legislate for X” is not enough.

It has been 20 years from the High Court ruling on the XCase and the referendum in which the Irish people rejected to rule out “risk to the life of the mother” as a reason for a lawful termination or legal abortion.

But even if tomorrow this government was to legislate for the XCase ruling where the previous 6 have failed to do, it would not be enough.

It would not be enough, as it won’t cover women who need a medical termination due to fatal fetal abnormalities.

http://www.terminationformedicalreasons.com/

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The worst news that any expecting parent can receive, is that their unborn child will not survive outside of the womb. The law in Ireland does not allow mothers and fathers the personal choice to terminate a pregnancy under these very tragic circumstances. Instead, we are forced abroad, without care or advice, to undergo termination procedures.

It won’t be enough as it won’t cover women like Michelle Harte, was being treated for cancer.

http://www.irishhealth.com/article.html?id=18394

A woman who is terminally ill has claimed she was forced to travel to Britain for an abortion earlier this year.

She was advised by her doctors to terminate her pregnancy because of the risks to her health. However, an ethics forum at Cork University Hospital decided against sanctioning an abortion for her in Ireland.

Michelle Harte of Co. Wexford said that doctors at the hospital where she was being treated for cancer had advised her to terminate her pregnancy because of the risks to her health.

However, the ethics forum went against the medical advice on the basis that Michelle Harte of Co Wexford’s life was not under immediate threat.

It wont be enough for Ms C, had been under going chemotherapy for 3y years and when she took the Irish State to the EU court of Human rights they found that the state violated article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights in how it had failed her due to there being no way she could find out if she could have a lawful termination or legal abortion here at home.

3 reasons why to legislate for X is not enough, women deserve better.

New emergency contraceptive, 120 hour window.

There is a new emergency contraceptive which has been approved for use.
It is called Ella one.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulipristal_acetate
http://ec.princeton.edu/pills/ella.html

It can be taken up to 120 hours after intercourse rather then the 72 hour window for what is known as the morning after pill.

The morning after pill is most effective 93% if taken with in 12 hours, and how effective it is decrease until it’s about 50% if taken at it’s 72 hour limit.

Ella one can be taken up until 120 hours later and will stop 60% of unwanted pregnancies.

I know it’s not as good as contraception or the morning after pill if taken with in 12 hours but, if you can’t get to a chemist for what ever reason with in the 72 hour window it’s an option.

Ella one is not available over the counter you will have to see a dr to get it prescribed. But hurrah for more options but please remember if there is a chance you could end up pregnant there is a chance you’ve gotten an STI, do don’t forget to get tested.

http://www.irishexaminer.com/archives/2012/0717/ireland/number-of-women-attending-sexual-health-clinics-falls-201045.html

The average age of a woman having a first child in Ireland is now 31 and Dr McQuade said many young women in their 20s — the age group which has seen the largest fall in numbers attending the clinics — had no intention of having a baby until they were in their 30s.

The availability of over- the-counter contraception in pharmacies has also contributed to the fall in numbers attending the clinics, but Ms Begas said: “It may still be better for these women to discuss their family planning needs with a family doctor or GP.”

She said a new emergency contraceptive called ellaOne — which can be taken within five days of unprotected sexual intercourse and which more than halves the chances of pregnancy — is now available from GPs.

A recent study found that 12% of young women were now opting for longer-term forms of contraception.